Green Common Doubles Down on Chinese Market with 2 New Shanghai Stores

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Green Common, the plant-based grocery and eatery concept launched by Hong Kong’s Green Monday group, has just opened two new locations in Shanghai. It comes after Green Common introduced its first Shanghai store last year, as the vegan startup looks to continue its expansion in the lucrative mainland Chinese market, where demand for plant-based food is on the rise. 

Green Common has just opened two new storefronts in Shanghai, in the Hall of the Sun and Taikoo Li Qiantan. Both stores feature the Hong Kong startup’s new brand colour, dubbed the “Green Common Aqua”, designed to celebrate the “boundless spectrum of nature”. Beyond upgraded vegan menus for dine-in and takeaway and Green Common’s signature retail side, the new stores are fitted with a Vegan Drinks Bar, a new addition to the concept. 

It comes just months after Green Monday, the group that operates Green Common and the food tech venture OmniFoods, which is famous for its vegan pork analogue OmniPork, opened its first-ever Shanghai store in late 2020. 

Green Common, Taikoo Li Qiantan.

Green Common stores in Shanghai

The two new stores will be located at Hall of the Sun, at the heart of the new North Bund landmark in Hongkou district, and in Taikoo Li Qiantan, an open-park and shopping mall featuring a rooftop and green spaces. 

Green Common has revamped its menu for the new locations, bringing in dishes that just launched at its rebranded Hong Kong flagship store, including the Omni-Lolli-Pork and other culinary creations made from OmniFoods’ signature Mince, Strip and Luncheon vegan pork analogues. 

Other dishes will be made from the food tech’s latest OmniSeafood line, which made its first debut in Hong Kong earlier this year, and will feature on plates such as fish burgers, tuna tartare, crab cakes, and fish and chips—all 100% vegan, of course.

Vegan dishes served at the new Shanghai locations.

Commenting on the launch of the stores, Green Monday founder and CEO David Yeung said: “As the pioneer of the industry, we are beyond proud to open Green Common in the prestigious landmarks Hall of the Sun, Ruihong Tiandi and Taikoo Li Qiantan. We will continue our endeavour to discover the boundless potential of vegan cuisine.”

Mainland China expansion

The expansion in China comes as the plant-based demand in the country reaches new highs, driven by rising consumer awareness of health, nutrition and food security. China, the world’s most populous country, represents an enormous opportunity for plant-based startups to capitalise on as interest in vegan food continues to grow. 

Vegan drinks bar at Hall of the Sun Green Common.

One report estimates that the Chinese plant-based meat market will see demand grow by 200% over the next few years. 

“We are glad to see sustainable lifestyles becoming more widespread and valued across the nation,” shared Yeung. 

Aside from launching Green Common stores in mainland China, Green Monday’s presence in the country spans its footprint in the e-commerce market with players like Tmall, as well as OmniFoods’ numerous QSR partnerships with chains such as Starbucks and Taco Bell.

Plant-based fish burger on Green Common’s menu.

Green Monday continues its global journey

Aside from doubling down on the mainland Chinese market, the Hong Kong-based vegan pioneer has also ramped up its presence across the world as the plant-based movement continues to accelerate globally. 

Fuelled by a record $70 million funding round, the group recently entered the US market, launching across a number of restaurants before rolling out with national retail chains including Sprouts and Whole Foods. It added to the company’s growing distribution network, which includes the UK, Japan, Singapore and Australia, among the 20 countries in total. 

In its domestic market, Green Monday has solidified its position as the city’s largest plant-based player in a series of high-profile collaborations with large F&B companies, from fast food chains like McDonald’s and KFC, to Hong Kong’s largest convenience store 7-Eleven.


All images courtesy of Green Common.

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