Biospringer Debuts Yeast Protein For Plant-Based Cheese & Meat That Combats ‘Off-Notes & Off-Tastes’

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Biospringer, a biotech unit under French fermentation giant and the world’s biggest yeast producer Lesaffre, has announced the launch of its new yeast protein that has been specifically developed for plant-based cheese and meat alternatives. The product, called Springer Proteissimo 101, is described as a nutrition-rich, vegan and gluten-free ingredient that is versatile and able to combat the off-notes that some consumers find in plant-based foods on the market. 

Unveiled last week, Biospringer’s new Springer Proteissimo 101 product is a complete protein developed using the company’s patented yeast fermentation technology, and was specifically created to be used as an ingredient in plant-based alternatives. Its key standout quality is its ability to produce a clean flavour with no off-taste or flavours – a major consideration for plant-based brands and manufacturers when it comes to ensuring their products can deliver on taste to reach the mass market. It also makes the ingredient a highly versatile one that can be incorporated into a range of formats and product categories.

It was developed by the R&D team at Lesaffre in collaboration with research institutes across Europe, including Agro Paris Tech, Wageningen University & Research, Improve, ProDigest, Ecoact and Campden BRI.

Plant-based proteins’ taste is often characterised as earthy, beany or starchy depending on the protein source whereas the strongest characteristic of yeast protein is its complete lack of troublesome off-flavour.

Vanessa Gougeon, Product Manager of Springer Proteissimo, Biospringer

Speaking to FoodIngredientsFirst about the new ingredient, Vanessa Gougeon, product manager at Biospringer, said: “Springer Proteissimo 101 can be used in many food applications but is especially designed for cheese and meat substitutes, including vegan burgers, sausages or nuggets.” 

“Plant-based proteins’ taste is often characterised as earthy, beany or starchy depending on the protein source whereas the strongest characteristic of yeast protein is its complete lack of troublesome off-flavour,” Gougeon said. “Using yeast in food products for its protein content is just a new way to focus on the value of this ingredient that has been used for millennia.”

Biospringer was able to achieve this by leveraging the company’s in-depth knowledge of yeast fermentation, and to separate the proteins that could achieve a clean taste profile as well as better textural qualities that would be especially applicable in improving the meltability of plant-based cheese and the bite of meat products that consumers desire

“We see that Springer Proteissimo 101 shows a good melt-behaviour in vegan cheese and improves chewability in meat analogs,” Gougeon said during the interview. 

The company has described the product as “revolutionary” as it delivers on these characteristics while still retaining a strong protein profile, containing at least 75% protein, made up of high-digestibility amino acids and a particularly high concentration of branched-chain amino acid (BCAAs), specifically leucine and lysine.

We see that Springer Proteissimo 101 shows a good melt-behaviour in vegan cheese and improves chewability in meat analogs.

Vanessa Gougeon, Product Manager of Springer Proteissimo, Biospringer

In addition, the brand says that the ingredient is kosher and halal certified, making it an accessible product that could reach mass consumers globally and particularly useful for big food players in their development of new plant-based alternatives. 

With the demand for plant-based proteins surging, particularly in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic sending consumers in search for healthier, safer and sustainable alternatives, ingredient innovation has been keenly watched by investors and industry giants as a space with enormous potential. 

Colorado-based food tech MycoTechnology, known for its bitterness-blocking vegan ingredient ClearTaste and mycelium-fermented pea and rice plant-based protein PureTaste, has caught the eye of big industry players, including Tyson Ventures and Kellogg-owned Eighteen94 Capital in a US$39 million Series D round.

French biomarine ingredient company Algaia has recently secured US$2.4 million in investment to develop a new range of seaweed-based solutions that can be used to create plant-based substitutes, while new Dutch fermentation startup The Protein Brewery has bagged US$26 million for its high-grade, low-carbon fungi-based food ingredient.


Lead image courtesy of Biospringer.


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